Skip to main content

[Seoul - Yeoksam] Costco Korea Food Court Pizza, Soup, Smoothie


A major reason most of my friends go to Costco is the food court! It's kind of famous for it's cheap prices and large quantity of food.


To be completely honest, I joined Costco because I needed a source of potato chips.

I usually get a slice of pizza, each slice is 2,500 KRW. It is probably bigger than my head and I probably shouldn't eat the whole thing.

There are 4 flavors - cheese, pepperoni, and combination (what I usually get). They also just introduced a fourth flavor in January - chicken and tomato. I have yet to try that, though.

The pizza is quite bread-y though. As you see in the picture, you can eat it there, or take it to go. You can also buy an entire pie for 12,500 KRW.


My friend got a cream of potato soup (2500 KRW) and my other friend go a combo pizza and a blueberry smoothie (I think 2,500 KRW).

Next time I will definitely get a bulgogi bake. My friend can attest that I really wanted one that day, but I couldn't say no to the pizza. It's 3,700 KRW. (I'll also take a picture of the menu the next time I go there.

One thing you will notice is that Koreans grab an extra plate to make their own "banchan." Costco has minced onions available for the hot dog sets (2,000 KRW for a refillable soda + hot dog). Koreans will grab an extra plate at the pick up window and then fill it with the minced onion and then cover the minced onions with ketchup and mustard.

My Korean friend and I tried it one day just because we felt the peer pressure. It was kind of, okay, really gross. Maybe we got it on a bad day, but we both were like...these onions taste a little...iffy. To us, it kind of tasted like they had been washing the kitchen with a dirty wash cloth and then cut the onions on the wet countertop. It was not pleasant.

However, we both are environmental health/public health professionals, so we are always a little leery about Korean kitchen cleanliness. But, just eat at your own risk, as is always the case.

The one annoying thing is that Costco in Korea is CASH ONLY (unless you have a Samsung card) and you have to go with someone with a membership.

I got a membership recently. It's 38,000 KRW for the year.
Honestly, I got it for the vegetables and the potato chips. A lot of the other stuff is not really that great of a deal if you don't have a huge freezer. And I definitely do not have a huge freezer.

*FTC Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links which means, at no additional cost to you, I may earn a commission if you click through the links provided and make a purchase.*

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

[Skincare Review] Head-to-Head Test: Estee Lauder Advanced Night Repair vs. La Mer The Concentrate

 As promised, here is my blog comparing the Estee Lauder Advanced Night Repair vs. the La Mer The Concentrate. FTC disclaimer: I was sent both of these items for free in exchange for my full and honest review. I tried to be as scientific as humanly possible. I had a blinded reviewer (my mom) who was actually unaware I was even doing a skincare test, so her opinion is completely blinded and she tried really hard to give a full and honest review of differences she noticed. I did this for 2 weeks. In the 14 days before the test, I was testing out the Estee Lauder ANP product in exchange for my review. I had enough product left (and actually received a second sample to test). My nighttime skincare routine was the same as usual. 1) DHC Cleansing Oil - Buy from YesStyle | Buy from Amazon 2) Micellar Water (for eye makeup) 3) Rosette Cleansing Paste Sea Clay Smooth - Buy From YesStyle  | Buy from Amazon I used my PMD Clean (from CAUSEBOX) to wash my face. I've been loving this device, se

[Life in Korea] Doing Laundry in Korea - Korean Laundry Machines

How to do laundry in Korea? I thought back to what were some of my most pressing questions when I first moved to Korea, I remembered that laundry was one of those things that I was the most concerned about. Moving to and Living in Korea Series! Part 1: Packing for study/living in Korea  |  Part 2: Getting a Phone in Korea Part 3: Doing Laundry in Korea  |  Part 4: Using your air conditioner in Korea Laundry is important!

[Life in Korea] Part 4: How to operate air conditioner (Remote + Translations)

How to use Korean air conditioning? I saw a post on Facebook the other day asking for translations of the air conditioning remote and I realized that I've never made a post about it! So, here it is! How to use Korean air conditioner (Korean air con)